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I have to side with both EthanDesu & Derek as much as I enjoy the daily snark from NTB.
We live in a world where the media falsely portrays what is ideal - I understand we need inspiration, but context & real life experience tends to be lacking in 2D photography. What many forget when they see “fashun” photographs is:
the team behind the photographer & the amount of photos that are taken, (we are talking in the hundreds/thousands then only a few are chosen)
this team is generally very technical in photography & not style
the team of stylists who again usually have no real world experience in the context of the shoot other than how to pin back an item of clothing as the “model” they have chosen does not have a real world body volume.. 
the post production of the photograph is also another level of manipulation. Colour shifts, excess wrinkles or creases are smoothed out, even accessories are photo-shopped in. & we all know how much of the model is photo-shopped as that is well documented. 
This then begs the question.. ?
If I use my daily posts as an example - recently I have tried to include movement to give another level of depth as the standard “robot” pose may help in understanding balance & proportion (on a very basic & visual level), but it does not show the connection between material & man. Video would be ideal, but I just don’t have the time or resources (no, I am not looking for an intern. That tongue in cheek post I did last year was poor form on my behalf & I apologise).
So my daily series of photographs are all done in a 5 minute time frame + another 10 minutes in “Aperture” (very basic work flow). No stylists with pins, no assistant, just my Sister if she is around before we go for breakfast & all she does is add comical relief.
I am not a model, far from it - I have sloped & forward pitched shoulders, flat ass, hyper extended knees, short back & back PHAT, beer belly, cyclist legs & I am not that tall. Meaning that I have had to learn what works for me & to have a good relationship with my tailor as he/she does the magic. In this case I have been very fortunate to have access to Patrick Johnson & Ethan Amos Newton.
The point being from the daily feedback I receive is that there is a genuine thirst for real world experience rather than “industry” #$%^&*@..
putthison:

Nice Try, Bro recently wrote this about the picture above:

One must wonder: is this just an unflattering photo of the gentleman on the left or does he indeed have way too much fabric in the upper back of his jacket?  Or maybe he recently hit the gym and shed some pounds.  Who knows.
But notice how much better the jacket homie on the right is wearing fits.  
Pinching and raising the neck of a jacket is usually done to correct collar flaws.  However, any time I have had my neck pinched and raised, I’ve noticed a better fit across the back as well.  You’d think this Florentine gentleman would have gotten that fixed, whether by pinch and raise or some other technique.
In any event, nice bag, bro.

To which Ethan Desu responded with:

A tailor much more skillful than myself once tried to explain to me the fascination of overtly tight clothing in young men new to tailored clothing. I mentioned to him the trend of those coming to me for suits, favouring jackets far too small, that looked magazine worthy while standing still but lacking any elegance or drape for movement.
 The example he used was that of a leather glove - close a fist and it looks molded to the skin, stretched as it is against the back of the hand. But open the fist and the glove will bag at the knuckles and extend past the ends of the fingers. It explained it well for me and I’ve strived for elegant fit ever since, not always successfully considering how well my wife cooks.
While neither gent has particularly great fit with these obviously off the rack cotton jackets, judging by a static image of two different body shapes in motion is a poor case study. While the man on the left has his left shoulder up and back, causing the imbalance and what you are seeing as the excess cloth, the man on the right is wearing a tight jacket to hide these sins. With a forward and sloping shoulder, the jacket pulls tight like the glove on a fist, and gives the impression of fit.
Dropping a collar is a fix for a too long back balance. The issue here is an imbalance from left to right, and a cotton jacket worn off the rack in a size that isn’t skin tight.  Had the photo been taken a second later you might be deriding Mr Short rather than Mr Tall.While taste is subjective without bounds - what I post and what I wear might have the coolest of tumblr scoff - fit has parameters, particularly in classic clothing. While it is tempting to praise the ultra slim, two dimensional fit, achieving clean lines with enough drape for movement and ease to remain elegant is the true marker of beautiful tailoring.

The last paragraph of Ethan’s post is something you should commit to memory. 

I have to side with both EthanDesu & Derek as much as I enjoy the daily snark from NTB.

We live in a world where the media falsely portrays what is ideal - I understand we need inspiration, but context & real life experience tends to be lacking in 2D photography. What many forget when they see “fashun” photographs is:

  • the team behind the photographer & the amount of photos that are taken, (we are talking in the hundreds/thousands then only a few are chosen)
  • this team is generally very technical in photography & not style
  • the team of stylists who again usually have no real world experience in the context of the shoot other than how to pin back an item of clothing as the “model” they have chosen does not have a real world body volume.. 
  • the post production of the photograph is also another level of manipulation. Colour shifts, excess wrinkles or creases are smoothed out, even accessories are photo-shopped in. & we all know how much of the model is photo-shopped as that is well documented. 

This then begs the question.. ?

If I use my daily posts as an example - recently I have tried to include movement to give another level of depth as the standard “robot” pose may help in understanding balance & proportion (on a very basic & visual level), but it does not show the connection between material & man. Video would be ideal, but I just don’t have the time or resources (no, I am not looking for an intern. That tongue in cheek post I did last year was poor form on my behalf & I apologise).

So my daily series of photographs are all done in a 5 minute time frame + another 10 minutes in “Aperture” (very basic work flow). No stylists with pins, no assistant, just my Sister if she is around before we go for breakfast & all she does is add comical relief.

I am not a model, far from it - I have sloped & forward pitched shoulders, flat ass, hyper extended knees, short back & back PHAT, beer belly, cyclist legs & I am not that tall. Meaning that I have had to learn what works for me & to have a good relationship with my tailor as he/she does the magic. In this case I have been very fortunate to have access to Patrick Johnson & Ethan Amos Newton.

The point being from the daily feedback I receive is that there is a genuine thirst for real world experience rather than “industry” #$%^&*@..

putthison:

Nice Try, Bro recently wrote this about the picture above:

One must wonder: is this just an unflattering photo of the gentleman on the left or does he indeed have way too much fabric in the upper back of his jacket?  Or maybe he recently hit the gym and shed some pounds.  Who knows.

But notice how much better the jacket homie on the right is wearing fits.  

Pinching and raising the neck of a jacket is usually done to correct collar flaws.  However, any time I have had my neck pinched and raised, I’ve noticed a better fit across the back as well.  You’d think this Florentine gentleman would have gotten that fixed, whether by pinch and raise or some other technique.

In any event, nice bag, bro.

To which Ethan Desu responded with:

A tailor much more skillful than myself once tried to explain to me the fascination of overtly tight clothing in young men new to tailored clothing. I mentioned to him the trend of those coming to me for suits, favouring jackets far too small, that looked magazine worthy while standing still but lacking any elegance or drape for movement.

 The example he used was that of a leather glove - close a fist and it looks molded to the skin, stretched as it is against the back of the hand. But open the fist and the glove will bag at the knuckles and extend past the ends of the fingers. It explained it well for me and I’ve strived for elegant fit ever since, not always successfully considering how well my wife cooks.

While neither gent has particularly great fit with these obviously off the rack cotton jackets, judging by a static image of two different body shapes in motion is a poor case study. While the man on the left has his left shoulder up and back, causing the imbalance and what you are seeing as the excess cloth, the man on the right is wearing a tight jacket to hide these sins. With a forward and sloping shoulder, the jacket pulls tight like the glove on a fist, and gives the impression of fit.

Dropping a collar is a fix for a too long back balance. The issue here is an imbalance from left to right, and a cotton jacket worn off the rack in a size that isn’t skin tight.  Had the photo been taken a second later you might be deriding Mr Short rather than Mr Tall.

While taste is subjective without bounds - what I post and what I wear might have the coolest of tumblr scoff - fit has parameters, particularly in classic clothing. While it is tempting to praise the ultra slim, two dimensional fit, achieving clean lines with enough drape for movement and ease to remain elegant is the true marker of beautiful tailoring.

The last paragraph of Ethan’s post is something you should commit to memory. 

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  19. magickcity reblogged this from putthison and added:
    Plus, the guy on the right looks like a moping neanderthal.
  20. ethandesu posted this