* How to wear “Prep” or “Trad” without looking like an extra from “Great Gatsby” or a Ralph Lauren campaign .. Thanks to the new follower for re-bRogging this from my archives. (Dec 2010. Sydney, Australia)
Bed time..
Details: SC - “cool effect” blazer by E. Zegna Couture, Shirt - bespoke, Tie - Gallo, Tie pin - Bottega Veneta, Belt - E. Zegna, PS - Kiton, Pantaloons - RL, Cigar - Partagas SD4!

* How to wear “Prep” or “Trad” without looking like an extra from “Great Gatsby” or a Ralph Lauren campaign .. Thanks to the new follower for re-bRogging this from my archives. (Dec 2010. Sydney, Australia)

Bed time..

Details: SC - “cool effect” blazer by E. Zegna Couture, Shirt - bespoke, Tie - Gallo, Tie pin - Bottega Veneta, Belt - E. Zegna, PS - Kiton, Pantaloons - RL, Cigar - Partagas SD4!

I still have this tear out from a magazine over 10 years ago..

I still have this tear out from a magazine over 10 years ago..

* Yes you can wear a hat, just don’t be self conscious or ironic.. Another great find from my archives (2009 Sydney, Australia). Liking how new followers are taking the time to go through the archives.

Easy like Sunday

Details: Cologne - Tom Ford, Hat - Akubra, Sunglasses - vintage RayBan, Shirt - bespoke, Watch - vintage Rolex Ref 1680, Pants - Uniqlo, Shoes - RLPL

Thanks blazerandtie: for digging this up..

Some GW-Grandmaster stuff from back in the good old days again…

mostexerent:

Airforce > Navy

I like blue suits as they are the most adaptable & always look crisp. Navy is fine for serious MAN business, so anything from French navy to Junior Navy or Airforce blue is preferable.

Details | Suit - P Johnson in Loro Piana wool/mohair for GW | shirt - P Johnson in Thomas Mason for GW | Pocket Square - Hermes | Tie - RAW silk Drakes | Hoofs - John Lobb “Phillip II” for Leather Soul

From now on when ever I get messages about clothing etc. I’m just going to direct them to   DieWorkWear & PutThisON as I can’t think of anyone else that consistently delivers “real world” advice.
I’m so sick of those bloggers that just re-blog with no “real world” experience or original content.
GW
putthison:

The Seven-Shoe Wardrobe
The longer I write about men’s clothing, the more disinclined I am to say what men should own. There’s tremendous variation in classic men’s style, and given that people live different lifestyles in different regions, it seems only the individual can say what’s right for him.
Still, I’ve always found it interesting to read what others think comprises a basic wardrobe, and have found such articles incredible useful for my own wardrobe-building endeavors. So long as people use these as ways to think more deeply about what they should own, I think they have value.
So, here’s what I think makes up a basic shoe wardrobe. Seven shoes, designed for weekday and weekend wear.
First are your “formal” shoes, which can be roughly divided into those with open lacing and those with closed. Closed laced shoes, otherwise known as balmorals or oxfords, have eyelet tabs that are sewn underneath the front part of the shoe. They’re a bit more formal than open laced designs, which are also commonly known as derbys or bluchers.
The black oxford:  I think you should own at least one pair of black oxfords. You can buy these with punched decorations around the toe caps or go full brogue, but for the purposes of keeping to just seven shoes, I recommend a plain toe design or something with a smooth toe cap. These will be your most formal shoes and they can be worn with suits to weddings, funerals, and formal receptions. Even if you don’t go to such things often, you will at some point, and you’ll need appropriate footwear. Plus, as I’ve written before, I think men should have a pair of black shoes for the evening. Black calf just gleams better at night.
Two less formal dress shoes: Of course, few of us are in a position where we need to wear suits often. Most men wear sport jackets and odd trousers, if not something even more casual. For these purposes, you’ll need two less formal dress shoes to rotate between during the workweek. There are a couple of options.
The first are bluchers (open laced designs). Here the eyelet tabs are sewn on top of the front section of the shoe, making the foot less “dressed up.” For these, you can choose a plain toe design or something with a toe cap. Toe caps make the shoes slightly more informal, and something with decorative perforations around the edges of the cap is more informal still. For something truly informal, you can choose Norwegian split toes, like the pair pictured above, or wingtips, which have a rustic sensibility.
Your other choice is to choose a brown oxford, which is more informal than black, and perhaps something in a casual material, such as suede. Like bluchers, these can have varying degrees of formality depending on the simplicity of the design. Toe caps and decorative perforations will always make a pair of shoes more informal, regardless if they’re of open or closed lacing.
I suggest that these two pairs be brown. Assuming you buy something of quality, brown develops a more interesting depth and richness than black. Plus, it arguably looks much better during the day. So now we have one pair of black oxfords for formal events and nighttime wear, and two pairs of brown dress shoes (either bluchers or a more casual oxford) for the workweek.
The penny loafer: Now for the weekend. For spring and summer, I suggest slip-ons. There are a dozen variations – driving mocs, horsebit loafers, boat shoes, etc. For something truly basic, I suggest brown penny loafers. The penny loafer is the sine non-qua shoe for post-war “Ivy Look,” but they don’t necessarily have to look Ivy or preppy. There are a dozen silhouettes these days to fit different styles, and a penny loafer can look as at home with a Continental look as it does with an American. Wear these with or without socks, depending on the weather and your style, but if you go without, be sure to know how to do it properly.
The chukka boot: For fall and winter weekends, I recommend boots. Again, there are a dozen of variations. Balmoral boots are quite dressy, and something like a jodhpur is very casual and rustic. I think the most basic and easy-to-wear boot, however, is the chukka, sometimes also referred to as the ankle boot. In some areas of the world, it’s acceptable to wear certain chukka boots with suits, but I think they’re most safely worn as a leisure shoe. Pair them with jeans, moleskins, corduroys, or heavy woolen flannels, and anything as casual as a quilted jacket or waxed cotton coat, to something a bit dressier such as a tweed sports jacket. 
Sneakers: For near year-round casual wear, I also think you should own a pair of canvas sneakers – Chuck Taylors, Jack Purcells, Vans Authentics, Supergas, Spring Courts, and the like. These are a relatively cheap way to add another pair of shoes to your weekend rotation. Each retails for between $40 and $60, and can be had for a bit less if you wait for sales. Plus, white canvas sneakers can look more harmonious with certain casual outfits than leather shoes of any stripe.
The seventh pair: The seventh pair will be up to you. If you live in a climate with harsh winters, perhaps you can pick up something from Jesse’s list here. If you live in warmer weather conditions, perhaps you’d like a more interesting pair of slip-ons, such as monk straps or tassel loafers. The point here is to choose something according to your needs or whimsy, in addition to what I think are the bare basics above.
And that’s the seven-shoe wardrobe. Enough to get you through nearly any occasion on any day in any season, and with enough options to allow you to properly rotate through your shoes while not having so many pairs that anything will be neglected. This to me is a basic and well-rounded shoe collection. 

From now on when ever I get messages about clothing etc. I’m just going to direct them to   DieWorkWear & PutThisON as I can’t think of anyone else that consistently delivers “real world” advice.

I’m so sick of those bloggers that just re-blog with no “real world” experience or original content.

GW

putthison:

The Seven-Shoe Wardrobe

The longer I write about men’s clothing, the more disinclined I am to say what men should own. There’s tremendous variation in classic men’s style, and given that people live different lifestyles in different regions, it seems only the individual can say what’s right for him.

Still, I’ve always found it interesting to read what others think comprises a basic wardrobe, and have found such articles incredible useful for my own wardrobe-building endeavors. So long as people use these as ways to think more deeply about what they should own, I think they have value.

So, here’s what I think makes up a basic shoe wardrobe. Seven shoes, designed for weekday and weekend wear.

First are your “formal” shoes, which can be roughly divided into those with open lacing and those with closed. Closed laced shoes, otherwise known as balmorals or oxfords, have eyelet tabs that are sewn underneath the front part of the shoe. They’re a bit more formal than open laced designs, which are also commonly known as derbys or bluchers.

The black oxford:  I think you should own at least one pair of black oxfords. You can buy these with punched decorations around the toe caps or go full brogue, but for the purposes of keeping to just seven shoes, I recommend a plain toe design or something with a smooth toe cap. These will be your most formal shoes and they can be worn with suits to weddings, funerals, and formal receptions. Even if you don’t go to such things often, you will at some point, and you’ll need appropriate footwear. Plus, as I’ve written before, I think men should have a pair of black shoes for the evening. Black calf just gleams better at night.

Two less formal dress shoes: Of course, few of us are in a position where we need to wear suits often. Most men wear sport jackets and odd trousers, if not something even more casual. For these purposes, you’ll need two less formal dress shoes to rotate between during the workweek. There are a couple of options.

The first are bluchers (open laced designs). Here the eyelet tabs are sewn on top of the front section of the shoe, making the foot less “dressed up.” For these, you can choose a plain toe design or something with a toe cap. Toe caps make the shoes slightly more informal, and something with decorative perforations around the edges of the cap is more informal still. For something truly informal, you can choose Norwegian split toes, like the pair pictured above, or wingtips, which have a rustic sensibility.

Your other choice is to choose a brown oxford, which is more informal than black, and perhaps something in a casual material, such as suede. Like bluchers, these can have varying degrees of formality depending on the simplicity of the design. Toe caps and decorative perforations will always make a pair of shoes more informal, regardless if they’re of open or closed lacing.

I suggest that these two pairs be brown. Assuming you buy something of quality, brown develops a more interesting depth and richness than black. Plus, it arguably looks much better during the day. So now we have one pair of black oxfords for formal events and nighttime wear, and two pairs of brown dress shoes (either bluchers or a more casual oxford) for the workweek.

The penny loafer: Now for the weekend. For spring and summer, I suggest slip-ons. There are a dozen variations – driving mocs, horsebit loafers, boat shoes, etc. For something truly basic, I suggest brown penny loafers. The penny loafer is the sine non-qua shoe for post-war “Ivy Look,” but they don’t necessarily have to look Ivy or preppy. There are a dozen silhouettes these days to fit different styles, and a penny loafer can look as at home with a Continental look as it does with an American. Wear these with or without socks, depending on the weather and your style, but if you go without, be sure to know how to do it properly.

The chukka boot: For fall and winter weekends, I recommend boots. Again, there are a dozen of variations. Balmoral boots are quite dressy, and something like a jodhpur is very casual and rustic. I think the most basic and easy-to-wear boot, however, is the chukka, sometimes also referred to as the ankle boot. In some areas of the world, it’s acceptable to wear certain chukka boots with suits, but I think they’re most safely worn as a leisure shoe. Pair them with jeans, moleskins, corduroys, or heavy woolen flannels, and anything as casual as a quilted jacket or waxed cotton coat, to something a bit dressier such as a tweed sports jacket. 

Sneakers: For near year-round casual wear, I also think you should own a pair of canvas sneakers – Chuck Taylors, Jack Purcells, Vans Authentics, Supergas, Spring Courts, and the like. These are a relatively cheap way to add another pair of shoes to your weekend rotation. Each retails for between $40 and $60, and can be had for a bit less if you wait for sales. Plus, white canvas sneakers can look more harmonious with certain casual outfits than leather shoes of any stripe.

The seventh pair: The seventh pair will be up to you. If you live in a climate with harsh winters, perhaps you can pick up something from Jesse’s list here. If you live in warmer weather conditions, perhaps you’d like a more interesting pair of slip-ons, such as monk straps or tassel loafers. The point here is to choose something according to your needs or whimsy, in addition to what I think are the bare basics above.

And that’s the seven-shoe wardrobe. Enough to get you through nearly any occasion on any day in any season, and with enough options to allow you to properly rotate through your shoes while not having so many pairs that anything will be neglected. This to me is a basic and well-rounded shoe collection. 

Dress your age, not mine ;)
* Beppe Modenese

Dress your age, not mine ;)

* Beppe Modenese

Boys - you have my details
thearmoury:

Carmina Uetam Loafers and The Armoury Selvedge Denim

Boys - you have my details

thearmoury:

Carmina Uetam Loafers and The Armoury Selvedge Denim

Beppe Modenese

Beppe Modenese

My good friend PCJ giving lessons on sneakers & suits

My good friend PCJ giving lessons on sneakers & suits

If you aren’t following Junior by now, you have been TOLD

* IMO of the current crop of young (<25) photographers in the style game, Liam is way ahead of them. He has a great eye, technically beyond his years & most importantly possess a good ethic.

liamsawthis:

Paris.

Four days, 4493 frames, like a hundred coffees, and one very tired photographer later. 

Well done & GOLF FRIGGIN CLAP 

thearmoury:

We finally got around to photographing our new baby, The Armoury 2, which focuses on accessories and allows The Armoury 1 to continue to specialise in tailored clothing. Hope to see you soon! 

(click the photo above for more images)

ethandesu:

One of the greatest pleasures in life, to me, is interacting with people who have passion. Passion is infectious when it is honest and true, it changes the colour and taste of your world, gives you a small insight into another mind.

A few years ago I met an incredibly passionate and knowledgable gent - Papa Nui. His story was similar to mine - he followed his passion in clothing to Japan, where the vintage and military replica market was strongest. Being there in the mid to late nineties, he was there for the thick of the creative days. The domestic denim market boomed in ‘92 with Denime, Evis, Warehouse, Gardener. Military started to take off with Buzz in Nylon, McCoys in leather. Everyone was specialised, bringing something new and well thought out, seemingly trying to compete for who could be the most authentic, who could provide the highest quality. Papa was there, consulting to the industry and specifically to McCoys.

By the time I arrived in 2001, the industry had changed. McCoys had splintered off into Toys, RMNZ and Nylon. Evis was nearly Evisu, and the hip hop connection was beginning. There were new young guys coming up - Skull by Alchemist was then a shrine to the Beatles, and guys like Samurai were bringing new things. 45RPM was laying the foundation for brands like Kapital. It was exciting, but it was the second wave.

Meeting Papa, it was clear that this was a guy who understood. He had a wealth of knowledge that the RRL’s of the world needed, but he was too busy catching early morning waves to get himself out there and be noticed.

When Papa started producing small bits and pieces, it was a no brainer for me. If he is making something, I am buying it, that simple. That I can write to him and ask him first hand is something I value even more highly, as guys like this don’t come along that often. It is what makes my life slightly surreal and astonishing.

Papa x Old Salt

Factoid: I too am a “student” of Papa way before Ethan met him. For me it was not long after I finished school that I had the opportunity to spend some quality time listening to Papa talk about the aesthetics of style post WW2 & how important to have form & function as well as a understanding of balance. So it was a great surprise when Ethan asked me to meet Papa a few years back. It was a surprise as I knew Papa as Johnny T, & you can imagine the surprise when we caught up.

One of the great lessons Johnny T taught me was about the urban tribe & how we all fit into certain urban tribes be it Teddy Boys, Preppies, Rude Boys, Skin Heads, New Romantics, Ska etc. etc. & how  there was always a initiation before acceptance. Totally different now with the advent of the internet. Suddenly todays youth can research & in some ways buy into a tribe or as I say “dressed by the internet”, but in reality they are just buying time before reality sets in.

Anyway, the world is very different now for good or bad.

I RIKE

Naoki Ota, senior executive officer and general manager, United Arrows. 

Wearing: a Boglioli jacket, Drakes tie, Incotex trousers, Alden shoes and is carrying a Chrome Hearts bag.

Source: GQ UK

PERSONALITY IN SPADES

TailoredFemininity
Emma Stone for Vogue

PERSONALITY IN SPADES

TailoredFemininity

Emma Stone for Vogue

Not for all as you need GRAVITAS to execute..
*The sun’s out here in London. And so are the neckerchiefs #londoncollections #attheshows (Taken with Instagram)

Not for all as you need GRAVITAS to execute..

*The sun’s out here in London. And so are the neckerchiefs #londoncollections #attheshows (Taken with Instagram)