HandMade - PATCH POCKETS
Sartoria Davide Tofani

HandMade - PATCH POCKETS

Sartoria Davide Tofani

Hand Made Buttonholes from Jeffery D on Vimeo.

Jeffery Diduch shows how good hand-made buttonholes are done.

"Can Can Do".. (as I hear too much in the land of "The Truman Show" - Singapore).. When the truth is "no can can LAH"..

So the challenge as often asked - can anyone wear a double breasted suit without looking like a fluffier” come doppelgänger exiting the set of a bad 90s porn film set.

Yes & No - there really is no definitive or scientific answer other than are you the star, starlet or …

The real question is, do you have the gravitas to wear a DB. Good tailoring can only do so much to hide one’s lack of. This also applies to most general style/sartorial questions I get asked every day. If you have to ask, then just maybe you are not at that place yet but not to say you won’t be tomorrow.

The DB is where FIT, BALANCE & PROPORTION is PARAMOUNT & unless you are gifted with good proportions, Made-to-Measure or bespoke is the best way.

This particular DB was my second MmMBC (Mystery MicroManageMent Bespoke Commission) & it took a long time, hence the “MicroManagement” as I chose to use a tailoring shop in Hong Kong that has good workmanship but required a STRONG guiding hand by a friend who has deep experience with the Northern Italian tailoring houses for aesthetic reasons & my self (the “fluffee” not “fluffier”)..

Interestingly the fit is OK even though I have lost some body mass over the last few years. But as I have always stated, start at the shoulders & then follow through as one’s foundation is the shoulder & this is your skeletal structure

On wearing this morning I immediately noticed some fit issues primarily due to my current smaller waist (weird, but true.. They must have removed the lard from the Shanghai dumplings) & not till I looked at the photos did I agree that all is still good. Like I harp on, GOOD FIT IS NOT TIGHT FIT..

Would I do this again? Maybe as it took quite some time & the process is very good for one’s yoga training. Luckily we did not have to re-order more cloth as have before with other commissions during the earlier days.

I hope this provides some insight to all the emails/messages & why I don’t recommend any tailoring houses in Asia, as there are many limitations on both sides of the counter. You & him/her.

Recently I embarked on another DB commission less the mM, this one will be slightly different in stylistic details so we will have to wait.

http://mostexerent.tumblr.com/post/11694324729/everyone-needs-a-dove-grey-db-in-a-open-weave

In summary, I have discussed the above a few times now, so please click on the below links as there is nothing else to add as I use my posts to answer many emails at once (& recently there have been a lot about DBs & men of shorter stature).

http://mostexerent.tumblr.com/post/8626589367/micro-management-one-of-the-joys-of-living-in-hkg

http://mostexerent.tumblr.com/post/752298114/double-trouble-in-the-land-of-invisible-men-in

BUT THE REAL REASON FOR THIS POST - NiceTryBro HATES DBS & I would like to offer him my CHALLENGE ;)

For those that are not following or aware.. Do visit as he has a solid voice & definite SNARK that I appreciate..

http://nicetrybro.tumblr.com/ 

In closing, bespoke tailoring is no different to a film production, everyone has a role & a star!

Details | Suit - MmMBC in 8.5 oz SummerPhasco for GW | Shirt - MBC in mystery linen for GW | Tie - Herringbone | Pocket Square - Drakes | Shades - vintage Moscot “Lemtosh” | Hoofs - Crocket & Jones “Begrave” (my foul weather & travel beaters)

Everyone needs a dove grey DB in a open weave English cloth for summer - very Gregory Peck..

Most will remember my post from last year regarding “Double Trouble in the land of Invisible Men in Grey Suits” discussing balance & proportion for the man shorter in stature.

I have applied very much the same principles as before with a few tweaks - more to come in a few months.

Please take note that this is the first fitting, so there is at least 2 more to come over the next few trips.

For posterity: 

Micro-management..

I get a lot emails asking about where to go in Singapore or Hong Kong for tailoring as there is this perceived notion that:

  1. Tailoring is cheap
  2. Tailoring is FAST
  3. Tailoring is Easy..

Unfortunately it is none of the above.

Especially if you have no experience or time. Time especially.

For example, the above has taken 3 fittings over a period of 6 months to get to this & there is at least 1 more before the finished product. Maybe ready for pick up this week.

OK I’m sure you could push for all the above to be completed in a month, but that is where many go wrong.

It takes time & lot’s micro management.

My advice, don’t unless you know what you are doing & stay away from those that promise a 48 hour delivery..

Stay tuned for the finished product.

* please don’t ask where as I do not want to be responsible for COVERING YOUR ASS. But If you want FAST FOOD THAT IS GOOD.. I’m still not telling as the hunt is the best part.

Very moody - very good

Very moody - very good

This winter passed I concentrated on cool tones - next winter will be warmer

This winter passed I concentrated on cool tones - next winter will be warmer

I have to side with both EthanDesu & Derek as much as I enjoy the daily snark from NTB.
We live in a world where the media falsely portrays what is ideal - I understand we need inspiration, but context & real life experience tends to be lacking in 2D photography. What many forget when they see “fashun” photographs is:
the team behind the photographer & the amount of photos that are taken, (we are talking in the hundreds/thousands then only a few are chosen)
this team is generally very technical in photography & not style
the team of stylists who again usually have no real world experience in the context of the shoot other than how to pin back an item of clothing as the “model” they have chosen does not have a real world body volume.. 
the post production of the photograph is also another level of manipulation. Colour shifts, excess wrinkles or creases are smoothed out, even accessories are photo-shopped in. & we all know how much of the model is photo-shopped as that is well documented. 
This then begs the question.. ?
If I use my daily posts as an example - recently I have tried to include movement to give another level of depth as the standard “robot” pose may help in understanding balance & proportion (on a very basic & visual level), but it does not show the connection between material & man. Video would be ideal, but I just don’t have the time or resources (no, I am not looking for an intern. That tongue in cheek post I did last year was poor form on my behalf & I apologise).
So my daily series of photographs are all done in a 5 minute time frame + another 10 minutes in “Aperture” (very basic work flow). No stylists with pins, no assistant, just my Sister if she is around before we go for breakfast & all she does is add comical relief.
I am not a model, far from it - I have sloped & forward pitched shoulders, flat ass, hyper extended knees, short back & back PHAT, beer belly, cyclist legs & I am not that tall. Meaning that I have had to learn what works for me & to have a good relationship with my tailor as he/she does the magic. In this case I have been very fortunate to have access to Patrick Johnson & Ethan Amos Newton.
The point being from the daily feedback I receive is that there is a genuine thirst for real world experience rather than “industry” #$%^&*@..
putthison:

Nice Try, Bro recently wrote this about the picture above:

One must wonder: is this just an unflattering photo of the gentleman on the left or does he indeed have way too much fabric in the upper back of his jacket?  Or maybe he recently hit the gym and shed some pounds.  Who knows.
But notice how much better the jacket homie on the right is wearing fits.  
Pinching and raising the neck of a jacket is usually done to correct collar flaws.  However, any time I have had my neck pinched and raised, I’ve noticed a better fit across the back as well.  You’d think this Florentine gentleman would have gotten that fixed, whether by pinch and raise or some other technique.
In any event, nice bag, bro.

To which Ethan Desu responded with:

A tailor much more skillful than myself once tried to explain to me the fascination of overtly tight clothing in young men new to tailored clothing. I mentioned to him the trend of those coming to me for suits, favouring jackets far too small, that looked magazine worthy while standing still but lacking any elegance or drape for movement.
 The example he used was that of a leather glove - close a fist and it looks molded to the skin, stretched as it is against the back of the hand. But open the fist and the glove will bag at the knuckles and extend past the ends of the fingers. It explained it well for me and I’ve strived for elegant fit ever since, not always successfully considering how well my wife cooks.
While neither gent has particularly great fit with these obviously off the rack cotton jackets, judging by a static image of two different body shapes in motion is a poor case study. While the man on the left has his left shoulder up and back, causing the imbalance and what you are seeing as the excess cloth, the man on the right is wearing a tight jacket to hide these sins. With a forward and sloping shoulder, the jacket pulls tight like the glove on a fist, and gives the impression of fit.
Dropping a collar is a fix for a too long back balance. The issue here is an imbalance from left to right, and a cotton jacket worn off the rack in a size that isn’t skin tight.  Had the photo been taken a second later you might be deriding Mr Short rather than Mr Tall.While taste is subjective without bounds - what I post and what I wear might have the coolest of tumblr scoff - fit has parameters, particularly in classic clothing. While it is tempting to praise the ultra slim, two dimensional fit, achieving clean lines with enough drape for movement and ease to remain elegant is the true marker of beautiful tailoring.

The last paragraph of Ethan’s post is something you should commit to memory. 

I have to side with both EthanDesu & Derek as much as I enjoy the daily snark from NTB.

We live in a world where the media falsely portrays what is ideal - I understand we need inspiration, but context & real life experience tends to be lacking in 2D photography. What many forget when they see “fashun” photographs is:

  • the team behind the photographer & the amount of photos that are taken, (we are talking in the hundreds/thousands then only a few are chosen)
  • this team is generally very technical in photography & not style
  • the team of stylists who again usually have no real world experience in the context of the shoot other than how to pin back an item of clothing as the “model” they have chosen does not have a real world body volume.. 
  • the post production of the photograph is also another level of manipulation. Colour shifts, excess wrinkles or creases are smoothed out, even accessories are photo-shopped in. & we all know how much of the model is photo-shopped as that is well documented. 

This then begs the question.. ?

If I use my daily posts as an example - recently I have tried to include movement to give another level of depth as the standard “robot” pose may help in understanding balance & proportion (on a very basic & visual level), but it does not show the connection between material & man. Video would be ideal, but I just don’t have the time or resources (no, I am not looking for an intern. That tongue in cheek post I did last year was poor form on my behalf & I apologise).

So my daily series of photographs are all done in a 5 minute time frame + another 10 minutes in “Aperture” (very basic work flow). No stylists with pins, no assistant, just my Sister if she is around before we go for breakfast & all she does is add comical relief.

I am not a model, far from it - I have sloped & forward pitched shoulders, flat ass, hyper extended knees, short back & back PHAT, beer belly, cyclist legs & I am not that tall. Meaning that I have had to learn what works for me & to have a good relationship with my tailor as he/she does the magic. In this case I have been very fortunate to have access to Patrick Johnson & Ethan Amos Newton.

The point being from the daily feedback I receive is that there is a genuine thirst for real world experience rather than “industry” #$%^&*@..

putthison:

Nice Try, Bro recently wrote this about the picture above:

One must wonder: is this just an unflattering photo of the gentleman on the left or does he indeed have way too much fabric in the upper back of his jacket?  Or maybe he recently hit the gym and shed some pounds.  Who knows.

But notice how much better the jacket homie on the right is wearing fits.  

Pinching and raising the neck of a jacket is usually done to correct collar flaws.  However, any time I have had my neck pinched and raised, I’ve noticed a better fit across the back as well.  You’d think this Florentine gentleman would have gotten that fixed, whether by pinch and raise or some other technique.

In any event, nice bag, bro.

To which Ethan Desu responded with:

A tailor much more skillful than myself once tried to explain to me the fascination of overtly tight clothing in young men new to tailored clothing. I mentioned to him the trend of those coming to me for suits, favouring jackets far too small, that looked magazine worthy while standing still but lacking any elegance or drape for movement.

 The example he used was that of a leather glove - close a fist and it looks molded to the skin, stretched as it is against the back of the hand. But open the fist and the glove will bag at the knuckles and extend past the ends of the fingers. It explained it well for me and I’ve strived for elegant fit ever since, not always successfully considering how well my wife cooks.

While neither gent has particularly great fit with these obviously off the rack cotton jackets, judging by a static image of two different body shapes in motion is a poor case study. While the man on the left has his left shoulder up and back, causing the imbalance and what you are seeing as the excess cloth, the man on the right is wearing a tight jacket to hide these sins. With a forward and sloping shoulder, the jacket pulls tight like the glove on a fist, and gives the impression of fit.

Dropping a collar is a fix for a too long back balance. The issue here is an imbalance from left to right, and a cotton jacket worn off the rack in a size that isn’t skin tight.  Had the photo been taken a second later you might be deriding Mr Short rather than Mr Tall.

While taste is subjective without bounds - what I post and what I wear might have the coolest of tumblr scoff - fit has parameters, particularly in classic clothing. While it is tempting to praise the ultra slim, two dimensional fit, achieving clean lines with enough drape for movement and ease to remain elegant is the true marker of beautiful tailoring.

The last paragraph of Ethan’s post is something you should commit to memory. 

Shirt Details.. Not a pirate shirt..
Details: Cotton spread collar, single cuff & no darts

Shirt Details.. Not a pirate shirt..

Details: Cotton spread collar, single cuff & no darts

Version 2 - Dang my sloped shoulders

1B SB 3 curved patch pocket navy sports coat in Loro Piana “The Wave

Tailoring Stories 3 - Curved patch pockets

Tailoring Tales

Like a menu in an Italian enoteca.. Cloth except for wine..

Hector (pooch) likes the choice..

What did I order?

Details: Cloth - Loro Piana “Zelander Flower” 100% naturally dyed wool. Blue with double window check in slate & tobacco

Jacket - 3 curved patch pocket, 2B SB, twin vent, soft shoulder, “kissing” 4 button surgeon cuffs, alabaster silk lining, hand finished option

Pantaloons - Flat front, button fly, belt-less + side tabs, on seam pockets & 5cm cuffs

Now the 4-6 week wait

Details: SC - MTM P Johnson, Shirt - Bespoke, Tie - Drakes (black & navy 2 tone silk knit), PS - Herringbone, Pantaloons - Incotex, Hoofs - “Dover” Edward Green for Leather Soul Hawaii